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The weed science program at Purdue University is searching for a research associate to provide support and leadership for our Field and greenhouse research program. See the link below or contact Dr. Bill Johnson if you have questions regarding the position. Job Summary Responsibilities for this position will include but are not limited to: Planning, directing and conducting field, greenhouse and laboratory experiments related to weed management in agronomic crops; including planning experiments, planting and managing the growth of plants, pesticide applications, collection of data and harvesting Working in conjunction with Purdue research personnel in weed science, agronomy and plant pathology, researchers at other universities and at various companies that fund some of this research Data management and analysis Preparing reports that will be submitted to a variety of groups including funding agencies and private industry Preparing manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals and other presentations to the scientific community Facilitating[Read More…]



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With large amounts of rain across the state during the month of May, farmers have struggled to plant hemp this season. There is also the threat of increased weed pressure and seedling diseases for anybody that manages to get seeds in the ground. From four years of hemp research at Purdue, we can attest that hemp does not like wet feet.


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Many alfalfa fields in northeastern Indiana suffered serious winter injury. Statewide, alfalfa weevil damage was more common this year and control was difficult because of persistent spring rain. Timely forage seeding of perennial legumes and cool-season grasses this spring was not possible because of excessive rain. Continued rainfall has limited the ability to make hay on a timely fashion and forage quality will be compromised. A result of all of these concerns is that forage supplies in the Midwest USA will likely be reduced in 2019. Producers need to carefully consider all options to meet forage needs if winter injury and waterlogged soils reduced forage yield and quality.





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As we close the doors on May for the year, one of the biggest stories throughout the month was the precipitation. The entire state was above normal. Northwestern Indiana was 3.41” above normal and southeastern Indiana was 0.18” above normal for the month (Figure 1). Temperatures were near normal in the northern and above normal in the central and southern tiers of the state. Some stations in Central Indiana recorded rainfall on 24 out of 31 days.


The Purdue Pest Management Program has made 3 videos available which address this year’s late-planting season. You can find them on YouTube using the following links:

Part 1 of 3: Historical Indiana Planting Dates and Yield Trends
https://youtu.be/rUhfkWcNXOQ

Part 2 of 3: Late Corn Planting Considerations
https://youtu.be/qlrn42V8dyI

Part 3 of 3: Late Soybean Planting Considerations
https://youtu.be/Lwr9kIOE84o


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