12 articles From: "September 2022"






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Plants are around us no matter where you live. I am challenged with plant identification as an agriculturalist and enjoy learning to identify plants that are not in production agriculture, too. A week ago, I was with an Extension Educator and a producer to confirm weeds of concern in a pasture; we then were able to discuss best control options. An email request, including pictures, from a hay producer was shared this week with me. Undesired plants of yellow foxtail, barnyardgrass, and crabgrass were noted and one photo had horsenettle in it, a spreading broadleaf plant that has toxic properties. Too many of us learned how to identify poison ivy from the unfortunate contact we had with it on a hike or learned how to identify it from someone else that felt itchy discomfort. Some individuals have taken an interest in foraging out food resources in the great outdoors. They[Read More…]


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After another wet weekend and cooler temperatures to start this week, it may be surprising to hear that conditions will be changing back to warm and dry for the next several weeks.  Climate models are strongly favoring above-normal temperature throughout the rest of September with a slight favoring of below-normal precipitation.  Abnormally dry conditions continue to persist in counties across northern Indiana, but the spatial extent is gradually shrinking  (Figure 1).  It is too soon to tell if the upcoming warm and dry outlooks will be strong enough to expand and intensify those drier areas or if a few periodic rain events will be enough to keep conditions relatively stable.  Monthly (October) and seasonal (September-October-November) outlooks were released on 15 September 2022.  For both of these time frames, the outlooks are favoring above-normal temperatures to continue with below-normal precipitation across Indiana (Figure 2). With each day that passes, we get[Read More…]


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With harvest season right around the corner, now is the time to start making plans for the control of winter annual weeds, including marestail.  When harvest and post-harvest conditions allow, fall is the best time to control many of these weeds.  This is because the weeds are a lot smaller in the fall, and our fall weather tends to be consistently warmer and drier than our variable cool and wet springs.  With fall-applied herbicide season upon us, we wanted to provide a few application tips to those who are planning on making fall herbicide applications: Scout fields and determine whether you need an application. Not all fields need an application; however, if you pull back the crop residue after harvest, especially in corn fields, you are likely to find infestations of winter annual weeds.  Scouting fields should begin soon after a field is harvested, with special attention paid to fields[Read More…]




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