6 articles tagged "soybean".

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Authors: Joe Ikley and Bill Johnson Many people have commented that we have the best stands of corn and soybean across the state that we have seen in many years. Our dry planting window certainly helped get crops uniformly established, but now we have been receiving many questions about herbicide carryover injury on crops this year. Any discussion about herbicide carryover will focus on three key components: environmental conditions since herbicide application; chemistry of the herbicides applied; and interactions between the herbicide and soil conditions. Weather is usually the driving component whenever we see injury from a wide variety of herbicides applied the previous year. While we have not been as dry as areas in the western corn belt, a look at our total precipitation from August 1st 2017 until June 1st of this year shows a large area of the state had 4 to 6 fewer inches of precipitation[Read More…]


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Author: Shaun N. Casteel Over the last few years,  we have been documenting some    remarkable soybean yield responses (upwards of 13 bushels) to sulfur (S) in northwestern Indiana. I shared more details of these trials this winter and in various articles across the Midwest.  We do have other sites across Indiana that have seen modest yield improvements (3 to 7 bushels) and other sites with no response. We have experimented with several products, rates, and scenarios, but we have not tried everything. I have received numerous calls and emails on the subject, so I want to provide some answers and leanings. Is my field and soybeans responsive to sulfur? My recommendation to answer this question is based on a set rate of S at the beginning of the season compared to no application. We have tested granular AMS (ammonium sulfate, 21-0-0-24S), MES10, and elemental S at various S rates at[Read More…]


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Authors: Joe Ikley and Bill Johnson After a delayed start to our planting season, we were able to plant both corn and soybean across the state in record or near-record time during May. This coincided with our hottest May on record, which was also dry in many areas of the state. This has allowed crops to emerge out of the ground quickly and rapidly progress through growth stages. We already have reports of waist high corn and flowering soybeans across the state. This article serves as a reminder for growth stage, height restrictions, and pre-harvest interval cutoffs for herbicide applications in both crops. Corn. There are a number of corn fields that did not receive a preemergence herbicide before the crops emerged from the ground. Many of these preemergence herbicides can also be applied postemergence. Some of the earliest cutoff timings are 8-inch corn for broadcast applications of 2,4-D, and[Read More…]


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Authors: John Obermeyer and Christian Krupke Increasingly, slugs are becoming a topic of discussion with field crop producers. Not from the slugs’ disagreeable nature, but because damage to crops is becoming more apparent. Fortunately, we know enough about slug biology to better predict high-risk fields, namely those with high residues and minimal tillage. Unfortunately, we have very few management options, i.e., rescue treatment, once they become problematic. The best slug management tactic is done right now, simply to wait to plant when the soils are ready. This is being written on May 2, as producers throughout the state are in a rush to catch up on planting progress, especially with rain in the forecast. Slugs feed on all portions of the corn and soybean plant. Generally, foliage feeding, though unsightly, will not hinder yield. Because slugs are nocturnal, their perfect world is for easy entrance into the seed slot to[Read More…]


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Author: Bob Nielsen The number of 30-, 40-, and 60-ft wide (or larger) field crop planters across the U.S. Midwest is greater today than, say, twenty years ago. Certainly, individual farmers can plant more acres of corn and soybean per day with today’s large field equipment than they could twenty years ago. This fact encourages optimism that planting season delays can be overcome by the capability of today’s modern planters to plant a greater percent of the state’s crop per week when “push comes to shove.” As is often the case with “logical conclusions”, the historical data do not necessarily support the logic. Historical planting progress data suggest that the maximum number of acres of corn and soybean planted per week has not changed much over the past 20 years. The accompanying figures illustrate the number of acres and percent of total acres planted during the respective weeks of maximum[Read More…]


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Author: Osama El-Lissy Deputy Administrator Plant Protection and Quarantine In 2016, Chinese officials put in place a new grain import law to keep invasive weeds and other plant pests from entering their country. Last fall, they informed USDA that U.S. grain shipments, particularly soybeans, did not comply with the new law. They specifically cited increased detections of weed seeds. These weed seeds threaten U.S. access to China’s grain market. If we do nothing, the United States may lose this valuable market. Consider: Approximately 1 of every 3 bushels of U.S. soybean are shipped to China, making it the United States’ largest market for this commodity. In 2017, this export was valued at $12.4 billion, which is approximately 91% by value of all grains shipped to China. To maintain access and ensure uninterrupted soybean trade with China, my agency, USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), has worked with U.S.[Read More…]


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