23 articles From: "August 2021"


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The sugarcane aphid (Melanaphis sacchari), a relatively new pest of grain sorghum, forage sorghums, sudangrass, sorghum-sudangrass hybrids and Johnson grass, first detected in Indiana in 2016, is making its presence known primarily in southcentral and southwestern counties.






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Precipitation and storm tracks this year seem to be stagnating in patterns that have caused some parts of Indiana to feel as if they are drowning and other parts to feel like they are in a drought.  Indiana is not a particularly large state, so it is impressive to see the extremes across such a short area.  Sometimes, these extremes can be explained from just one or two storm events that pass through, but recently it seems to be a series of events that set up this polarized pattern of precipitation winners and losers.  Figure 1 shows the 30-day accumulated precipitation presented as the percent of mean climatology for Indiana from July 21 to August 19.  Central Indiana has been experiencing dry conditions with some locations only have received 25%-50% of what they would normally receive during that time period.  In contrast, northeastern and southwestern Indiana have experienced a surplus[Read More…]


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Individuals interested in learning more about producing hemp for fiber and different post-harvest applications are invited to a field day at a fiber hemp farm in Martinsville Indiana on August 30th. This field day is hosted by the Midwest Hemp Council and Indiana Farmers Union. Attendees can expect a fun-filled day of learning and networking. Each session will include four stations, where attendees will learn about: The agronomics of hemp production, pests affecting hemp and how hemp fits into our Indiana agricultural landscape How hemp is harvested and post-harvest preparation before it goes to a processor The necessary processing steps of the hemp stalks, specifically decortication Novel and traditional applications of hemp fiber There are two sessions to choose from—one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Lunch is included for both sessions. To learn more and register, please visit https://www.midwesthempcouncil.com/fiber-forum-field-day.


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The grain fill period begins with successful pollination and initiation of kernel development, and ends approximately 60 days later when the kernels are physiologically mature. During grain fill, the developing kernels are the primary sink for concurrent photosynthate produced by the corn plant. What this means is that the photosynthate demands of the developing kernels will take precedence over that of much of the rest of the plant



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