299 articles tagged "Agronomy Tips".





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Twisted whorls sometimes develop in young corn plants early in the rapid growth phase. The cause is not well understood. The tightly twisted whorls eventually unwrap to reveal yellowish upper leaves that turn green after a few days of exposure to sunlight. Effects on yield are essentially nil. The curious phenomenon often referred to as the “twisted whorl syndrome” is beginning to show up in some fields in recent days. This “problem” often occurs when young corn shifts quickly from weeks of slow development (cool, cloudy weather) to rapid development (warm, sunny weather). Earlier planted corn has certainly experienced such a change in weather conditions in recent weeks. The occurrence of the twisted whorl syndrome is not uncommon, but rarely affects a large number of fields in any given year or a large percentage of plants within a field. The typical growth stage when growers notice the twisted whorls is[Read More…]




During this incredibly challenging 2019 planting season, Indiana corn and soybean farmers are faced with difficult planting decisions.  We have passed the June 5 date to begin electing prevented planting on corn acres, and the June 20 soybean date is quickly approaching.  With more rain in the forecast, we could see substantial acreage across Indiana in this prevented planting scenario. Policy and market dynamics are further complicating these decisions.  For farmers continuing to face delays due to saturated soils, prevented planting may appear to be a rather sour outcome in what is already a challenging agricultural economy.  Can we turn these proverbial lemons into lemonade? Farmers with livestock or neighboring livestock operations in need of forage could look at generating some revenue from these prevented planting acres by seeding forage-type cover crops that could be harvested or grazed starting November 1, and still provide a full prevented planting payment (see[Read More…]


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Many alfalfa fields in northeastern Indiana suffered serious winter injury. Statewide, alfalfa weevil damage was more common this year and control was difficult because of persistent spring rain. Timely forage seeding of perennial legumes and cool-season grasses this spring was not possible because of excessive rain. Continued rainfall has limited the ability to make hay on a timely fashion and forage quality will be compromised. A result of all of these concerns is that forage supplies in the Midwest USA will likely be reduced in 2019. Producers need to carefully consider all options to meet forage needs if winter injury and waterlogged soils reduced forage yield and quality.


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As May transitions to June, many Indiana corn growers are faced with substantial acreage yet to plant. Statewide, as of May 26 (USDA-NASS, 2019), only 22% of the state’s corn crop was estimated to have been planted. That disappointing planting progress positions the 2019 planting season AT THE MOMENT just slightly ahead of the similarly slow 1996, which currently holds the unenviable record for the most delayed planting season in the past 40 years. AND, there is still a chance we will surpass (or should I say “fall behind”?) that record by the time this planting season is finished. In the remaining days of May, thunderstorms continued to rumble across the state… sometimes across the north… sometimes across the south… sometimes through the central counties. Unless a rapid shift from rainy to sunny, warm, and windy occurs soon, the prospects of serious planting progress through the first week of June[Read More…]


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