Your browser does not support Javascript!
Back to CAPS Home

Asian Bush Honeysuckle(s)

Amur honeysuckle, Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder
Bella honeysuckle, Lonicera x bella Zabel [morrowii x tatarica]
Morrow's honeysuckle, Lonicera morrowii Gray
Tartarian honeysuckle, Lonicera tatarica Linnaeus

Amur Bush Honeysuckle bush honeysuckle Amur Bush Honeysuckle bush honeysuckle
Chuck Bargeron, Univ. of Georgia; Leslie J. Hehrhoff, Univ. of Connecticut; Patrick Breen, Oregon State Univ.

 

Commodities Affected:
Forestry and Natural Areas

 

Threat:

Asian bush honeysuckles are upright shrubs 6-15 feet tall with arching branches. Each of these species has dark green egg-shaped leaves.  They stand out in the understory of forests as the first shrubs to leaf out in the spring and the last to lose leaves in the fall. The paired, tubular flowers are white on Amur and Morrow honeysuckle and pink on Tartarian honeysuckle. Berries range from red to orange and are dispersed by birds. Asian bush honeysuckles grow so densely they shade out everything on the forest floor, often leaving nothing but bare dirt.  This means a great reduction in the food and cover available for birds and other animals. Some species release chemicals into the soil to inhibit other plant growth, effectively poisoning the soil. Asian bush honeysuckles are found throughout the state, but are particularly invasive in central and northern Indiana.  Note – do not buy, sell, or plant Asian bush honeysuckles.  <www.invasive.org>

 

Distribution:

Amur Honeysuckle

In 100 Years of Change in the Distribution of Common Indiana Weeds by William and Edith Overlease (2002) reported that Amur honeysuckle was not found in Indiana in 1899 (Coulter’s Catalogue of Indiana Plants) or in 1940 (Deam’s Flora), but could be found in the following 81 counties in 2002:  Allen, Bartholomew, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Cass, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, Delaware, Dubois, Elkhart, Fayette, Floyd, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Gibson, Grant, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Harrison,  Hendricks, Henry, Howard, Huntington, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Knox, Kosciusko, La Porte, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Martin, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Newton, Ohio, Orange, Owen, Parke, Perry, Pike, Posey, Pulaski, Putnam, Randolph, Ripley, Rush, St. Joseph, Scott, Shelby, Spencer, Starke, Sullivan, Switzerland, Tippecanoe, Tipton, Union, Vanderburgh, Vermillion, Vigo, Wabash, Warren, Warrick, Washington, Wayne, Wells, and White.

 

Bella Honeysuckle

In 100 Years of Change in the Distribution of Common Indiana Weeds by William and Edith Overlease (2002) reported that Bella honeysuckle was not found in Indiana in 1899 (Coulter’s Catalogue of Indiana Plants) or in 1940 (Deam’s Flora), but could be found in the following 65 counties in 2002: Adams, Allen, Bartholomew, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Carroll, Clark, Clinton, DeKalb, Delaware, Elkhart, Fayette, Fulton, Grant, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Henry, Howard, Huntington, Jackson, Jasper, Jay, Jefferson, Jennings, Kosciusko, LaGrange, Lake, La Porte, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Martin, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Newton, Noble, Orange, Owen, Parke, Porter, Pulaski, Putnam, Randolph, Ripley, Rush, St. Joseph, Starke, Steuben, Sullivan, Switzerland, Tippecanoe, Tipton, Union, Vermillion, Vigo, Wabash, Warren, Wayne, Wells, and White.

 

Morrow Honeysuckle

In 100 Years of Change in the Distribution of Common Indiana Weeds by William and Edith Overlease (2002) reported that Morrow honeysuckle was not found in Indiana in 1899 (Coulter’s Catalogue of Indiana Plants) or in 1940 (Deam’s Flora), but could be found in the following 62 counties in 2002: Allen, Bartholomew, Benton, Blackford, Boone, Brown, Carroll, Cass, Clay, Clinton, Crawford, DeKalb, Delaware, Elkhart, Fayette, Fountain, Franklin, Grant, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Henry, Howard, Huntington, Jasper, Jay, Jennings, Johnson, Kosciusko, LaGrange, Lake, La Porte, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Miami, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Newton, Noble, Orange, Owen, Parke, Porter, Pulaski, Ripley, Rush, St. Joseph, Shelby, Starke, Steuben, Tippecanoe, Tipton, Vermillion, Vigo, Wayne, Wells, White, and Whitely.

 

Tatarian Honeysuckle

In 100 Years of Change in the Distribution of Common Indiana Weeds by William and Edith Overlease (2002) reported that Tatarian honeysuckle was not found in Indiana in 1899 (Coulter’s Catalogue of Indiana Plants); however, in 1940 (Deam’s Flora) and in 2002 it could be found in Henry county.